Seen “Unbroken?” Then You Need to See This

Relevant Church Rochester NY_09

I read the book “Unbroken.” I loved it. We went to see the movie. It was a well-done movie that was painful to watch. And I believe they did a great job of telling the story, but at the end there are a couple of phrases on the screen that talk about Louie’s spiritual transformation. I appreciated that it was acknowledged, but I wish they would have shown that part instead of just mentioning in text at the end of the movie. But it is too easy to be a critic. Overall, I was very pleased with the movie. And wish they would do a part 2 – telling about what happened when he got back from being a prisoner of war. That’s the better part of the story!
If you’ve seen the movie but haven’t read the book – you really need to know the rest of the story. So – please watch THIS video. Here are five great reasons to give 28 minutes of your life to this video:
  • It will take less time than the movie (28 minutes vs. 2 hours)
  • It is free (vs. $10.00 or more)
  • It gives you the spiritual dimension of Louie’s story (so much more satisfying than a story of the enduring human spirit)
  • You will love and appreciate Louie more after this 28 minutes than after the 2 hours of the movie.
  • It will grow your faith in the power of the Gospel.
BillyGraham.org originally posted the video HERE. As always, if you can’t see the video above (because you receive this via email) – click HERE to watch it.
2 comments
  1. Zamperini’s son wrote an interesting piece about his father’s perspective on the way his faith was portrayed in the film (http://bit.ly/unbroken-film-faith). Here’s a section that connects with what you’ve posted in the past about Christian films:

    “Unbroken tells my Dad’s story the way he told it: chronicling all he lived through so that what he did after becoming a Christian—forgiving his captors—would have the most resonance with audiences of all faiths, and no faith at all…That was his greatest hope for the film version of Unbroken: not that it would be applauded by fellow Christians, although he certainly would have been honored and humbled by their appreciation; but that it would be seen by non-Christians drawn to a rousing epic about the indomitable human spirit who, when the credits have finished rolling, might just discover there’s a whole lot more to his story than that.”

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