Overestimating the Power of One

Perception

It seems to me…

  • Most pastors tend to overestimate the power of ONE sermon and undersestimate the power of MANY sermons.
  • Most parents tend to overestimate the power of ONE conversation and underestimate the power of MANY conversations.
  • Most small group leaders tend to overestimate the power of ONE meeting and underestimate the power of a semester of meetings.
  • Most teachers tend to overestimate the power of ONE lesson and underestimate the power of MANY lessons.
  • Most people tend to overestimate the power of ONE spoken "I love you" and underestimate the power of a lifetime of "I love you's".
  • Many people tend to overestimate the negative impact of ONE unhealthy meal and underestimate the power of a year of healthy or unhealthy eating habits.

What other ones come to your mind?

 

6 comments
  1. Dave,

    I was a cross country / track athlete for seven years, and I’ve seen this principle over and over:

    -Many people tend to overestimate the power of ONE great workout and underestimate the power of an entire season of average workouts.

    Thanks for this reminder!

  2. Most leaders tend to overestimate the power of positive thinking and underestimate the power of planning and execution.

    Most teens tend to overestimate perceived gratification and underestimate the lifelong consequences of a single wrong decision (ok…not just teens).

    Most people tend to overestimate their own ability to realize true joy and underestimate the power of God’s will in their lives.

  3. Most people tend to underestimate the power of one “I was wrong, I am sorry” and overestimate the power of many “I think you misunderstood me’s”.

    One face to face, sincere dialog, exceeds a hundred e-mails, texts, and message forwards. My point to this is, it is extremely easy to misunderstand the intent of a non-personal contact, over a face to face.

  4. Many people overestimate the power of one GRAND gesture and underestimate the power of the many seemingly mundane moments (thank you Paul Tripp)

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